Women not offered full range of postpartum contraception

May 7, 2017

Women not offered full range of postpartum contraception

MedScape

Only a handful of women are receiving long-acting reversible contraception immediately after delivery, as recommended by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), according to a study of postpartum trends in the United States.

The insertion of long-acting reversible conception immediately after delivery, such as implants and intrauterine devices (IUDs), is a relatively new service, and rates have increased in recent years, said IHPI investigator Lindsay Admon, MD, from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

However, the rate "remains at less than 2% of the rate of tubal ligation," she said during a press briefing here at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 2017 Annual Meeting.

Maternity clinicians and policymakers should strive to ensure that women have full access to the contraceptive mix after childbirth, so they can make an informed, voluntary, and personal choice about whether and when to have another child," said Dr Admon.

Many Medicaid beneficiaries lose coverage 60 days after delivery, so they are likely highly motivated to initiate long-acting birth control, study investigator and fellow IHPI member Michelle Moniz, MD, an obstetrician-gynecologist in Brighton, Michigan, told Medscape Medical News.